An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests patients try chiropractic services for the treatment of low back pain. According to the article, surgery is not usually needed and should only be considered if more conservative therapies fail. The information in JAMA reinforces the American Chiropractic Association’s (ACA) position that conservative care options should serve as a first line of defense against pain.

The article, part of JAMA’s Patient Page public education series, explains that the back is made up of bones, nerves, muscles and other soft tissues such as ligaments and tendons that support posture and give the body flexibility. Back pain can be caused by problems with any of the structures in the back.

As neuromusculoskeletal experts, chiropractic physicians are particularly well suited to manage and help prevent low back pain.

“We are encouraged to see JAMA suggest patients try chiropractic and other more conservative types of treatment for their back pain. In many cases pain can be alleviated without the use of unnecessary drugs or surgery, so it makes sense to exhaust conservative options first,” said ACA President Keith Overland, DC.

“Research confirms that the services provided by chiropractic physicians are not only clinically effective but also cost-effective, so taking a more conservative approach at the onset of low back pain can also potentially save both patients and the health care system money down the line,” he added.

..Taken from the AMA website  http://www.acatoday.org/press_css.cfm?CID=5185

Taken from ACA website:

In a study funded by NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine to test the effectiveness of different approaches for treating mechanical neck pain, 272 participants were divided into three groups that received either spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) from a doctor of chiropractic (DC), pain medication (over-the-counter pain relievers, narcotics and muscle relaxants) or exercise recommendations. After 12 weeks, about 57 percent of those who met with DCs and 48 percent who exercised reported at least a 75 percent reduction in pain, compared to 33 percent of the people in the medication group. After one year, approximately 53 percent of the drug-free groups continued to report at least a 75 percent reduction in pain; compared to just 38 percent pain reduction among those who took medication.

— Bronfort et al. (2012), Annals of Internal Medicine

Dr. Kuna will soon be certified and registered by the National Registry of Commercial Medical Examiners (NRCME) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to perform medical exams for  interstate truck and bus drivers.

To perform the medical exam for commercial drivers, federal regulations require all health care providers (MD, DO, DC, APN, PA, NP)  to become certified in the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

Also, this requires healthcare professionals who perform medical examinations for interstate truck and bus drivers to be trained, tested and certified on the specific physical qualifications that affect a driver’s ability to safely operate a vehicle. The final rule also creates a national online database of medical examiners (the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners), where those who have passed the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) certification process will be listed.